Cover of: Hospital | Julie Salamon

Hospital

man, woman, birth, death, infinity, plus red tape, bad behavior, money, God, and diversity on steroids

Published by Penguin Press in New York .
Written in English.

About the Book

A fact of life is that one day, you or a loved one will be a patient in a hospital. When you walk through that door, you will enter a world where bureaucracy, miscommunication, budgets, politics, personalities, and religion can influence the medical attention you receive as much as seeing a doctor. The story of how hospitals actually run has never been told—until now—from the vantage point of the people who work inside. Bestselling author and award-winning journalist Julie Salamon follows a year in the life New York’s Maimonides Medical Center, painting a revealing portrait of how big medicine operates today in Hospital: Man, Woman, Birth, Death, Infinity, Plus Red Tape, Bad Behavior, Money, God and Diversity on Steroids. Noted for casting surprising new light on subjects we think we know, Salamon (author of The Devil’s Candy, Facing the Wind, and Rambam’s Ladder) was granted an astonishing “warts and all” level of access by the hospital. She followed doctors, patients, administrators, nurses, ambulance drivers, cooks and cleaning staff. The resulting narrative is not unlike a novel, with a richly detailed cast of characters: There are bitter internal feuds, warm personal connections, comedy, egoism, greed, love and loss. There are rabbinic edicts to contend with, as well as imams and herbalists and local politicians. There are systems foul-ups that keep blood test results from being delivered on time, compulsive bosses, careless record-keepers, shortages of everything except forms to fill, recalcitrant and greedy insurance reimbursement systems, and the unsettling difficulty of getting doctors to wash their hands. Located in a community where 67 different languages are spoken, Maimonides is a case study for the particular kinds of concerns that arise in institutions that serve an increasingly multicultural American demographic. How do the essential requirements of medicine—tending the sick—play out against the competing pressures of money, technology, multiculturalism, politics (internal and external) and religious differences? Layer by layer, Hospital unfolds the many variables at play in an institution that deals with people at their most vulnerable; an institution made up of hundreds of individuals, each of whom makes a difference, for better and sometimes for worse, and most of whom are unaware of what makes the entire place tick. This is the dynamic universe of small and large concerns and personalities that, taken together, determine the nature of our care and assume the utmost importance.

About the Edition

A bestselling author and award-winning journalist follows a year in the life of a big urban hospital, painting a revealing portrait of how medical care is delivered in America today.

Table of Contents

Occam lied
Pooh-bah
Insults and injuries
Safety nets
The fixer
Ability, affability, availability
We speak your language
No margin, no mission
The code of mutual respect
A good death
The big brass ring
Medical advances and retreats.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [343]-349) and index.

Genre
Personal Narratives.

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
362.1109747/23
Library of Congress
RA982.N5 M357 2008

The Physical Object

Pagination
xv, 363 p. ;
Number of pages
363

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL18865371M
Internet Archive
hospitalmanwoman00sala
ISBN 10
1594201714
ISBN 13
9781594201714
LC Control Number
2007045629
Library Thing
4959580
Goodreads
2320120
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History

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July 30, 2014 Edited by ImportBot import new book
April 5, 2014 Edited by ImportBot Added IA ID.
August 18, 2010 Edited by IdentifierBot added LibraryThing ID
April 24, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Fixed duplicate goodreads IDs.
October 20, 2008 Created by ImportBot Initial record created, from Library of Congress MARC record.