Cover of: Stained glass for dummies | Vicki Payne

Stained glass for dummies

Published by Wiley in Hoboken, NJ .
Written in English.

About the Book

Overview: Discover the artist within and create beautiful stained glass. Beautiful stained glass isn't reserved solely for church windows-it can be used to create intricate patterns in home windows, decorate cabinet doors, patio doors, ceilings, skylights, mirrors, lighting fixtures, garden decorations, and much more. Stained Glass For Dummies provides all the information you need to express your creativity and spruce up your home with this timeless art. You'll get a full range of art glass instruction, from traditional leaded stained glass to hot glass-working techniques. Gorgeous full-color design throughout; Includes designs for creating your own stained glass pieces; Hands-on, easy-to-follow exercises help you perfect your skills. Packed with practical guidance on everything from obtaining supplies to working safely, Stained Glass For Dummies is the perfect guide for beginner and novice artists and artisans who want to try a hand at this centuries-old art.

About the Edition

Overview: Discover the artist within and create beautiful stained glass. Beautiful stained glass isn't reserved solely for church windows-it can be used to create intricate patterns in home windows, decorate cabinet doors, patio doors, ceilings, skylights, mirrors, lighting fixtures, garden decorations, and much more. Stained Glass For Dummies provides all the information you need to express your creativity and spruce up your home with this timeless art. You'll get a full range of art glass instruction, from traditional leaded stained glass to hot glass-working techniques. Gorgeous full-color design throughout; Includes designs for creating your own stained glass pieces; Hands-on, easy-to-follow exercises help you perfect your skills. Packed with practical guidance on everything from obtaining supplies to working safely, Stained Glass For Dummies is the perfect guide for beginner and novice artists and artisans who want to try a hand at this centuries-old art.

Table of Contents

Introduction
About this book
Conventions used in this book
What you're not to read
Foolish assumptions
How this book is organized
Part 1: Glass, Glorious Glass
Part 2: Easing Your Way Into The Art: Basic Stained-Glass techniques
Part 3: Practice Makes Perfect: Stained-Glass projects Aplenty
Part 4: Adding A Little Heat To The Mix: Working With Warm Glass
Part 5: Part Of Tens
Icons used in this book
Where to go from here
Part 1: Glass, Glorious Glass
Welcome to the world of glass
Stained-glass techniques
Leaded glass
Copper-foiled glass
Adding a little heat: warm glass
Getting to know glass
Surveying different glass types
Touch and feel: taking a look at textured glass
Getting started with the right tools
Getting a handle on hand tools
Glass cutters
Variety of pliers
Warming up to soldering equipment
Soldering irons
Soldering iron tips
Soldering iron stands
Tip cleaners
Solder
Getting turned on to power tools
Glass grinders
Saws
Constructing your project with the right tools
Looking at lead-specific tools
Focusing on foil-specific tools
Staying safe: purchasing the right safety equipment for glass projects
Assembling basic drafting supplies
Paper for patterns
Rulers and triangles
Pattern shears
Adhesives
Markers and knives
Light box
Setting up your glass-working studio
Knowing what makes for a good studio space
Flooring
Lighting
Ventilation
Storage spaces
Setting up workstations and storage areas within your studio
Workbench and worktable areas
Grinder station
Storage area for all your tools
Glass storage area
Storage area for lead and other metals
Part 2: Easing Your Way Into The Art: Basic Stained-Glass Techniques
Designed to succeed: working with patterns and selecting your glass
Patterns 101
Using ready-to-build patterns
Having three copies of each pattern
Enlarging designs with an opaque projector
Laying out your pattern
Determining your project's finished size
Drawing the outside dimensions of your panel
Incorporating cut size into your pattern
Tracing your design onto your pattern
Numbering the pieces
Color coding the pieces
Marking the grain of your glass
Cutting out and working with templates
Cutting templates
Keeping track of your templates
Selecting glass for various projects
Cathedral glass
Opalescent glass
Textures and patterns
Making the cut: glass cutting 101
Selecting your practice glass
Getting to know your glass cutter
Preparing the cutter
Getting a proper grip
Cutting straight lines
First things first: making the score line
Letting it all fall apart: breaking scored glass
Working with curves
Cutting curves
Controlling the break and run
Cutting out shapes around your templates
Positioning templates for cutting
Cutting the right way: inside curve, outside curve, straight line
Cutting out circles
Grozing and grinding glass for a perfect fit
Working with grozing pliers
Filing
Nipping and prying
Powering up for faster results: glass grinders
Using your grinder
Marking your pieces before making adjustments
Soldering your way to well-jointed projects
Solder 101: what it is and how it works
Prepping and using your soldering iron
Setting your iron to the correct temperature
Getting a good grip on your iron
Keeping your tip clean
Soldering cooper-foil projects
Selecting the right solder for copper-foil projects
Applying flux to your project
Tackling tack soldering
Running the perfect bead
Removing excess solder
Soldering lead-came projects
Selecting the right solder for lead-came projects
Testing your iron's temperature
Soldering the perfect joint
Removing excess solder
Soldering safety
Part 3: Practice Makes Perfect: Stained-Glass Projects Aplenty
Creating copper-foil projects
Cutting and foiling your glass pieces
Prepping the pattern and cutting your glass
Setting up your work board
Selecting your foil
Applying the foil
Soldering copper-foil projects
Framing and tack soldering for stability
Filling in the gaps
Running a bead to connect the pieces
Soldering intersections
Removing excess solder from seams
Creating a solder frame for smaller projects
Abracadabra: the magic of wire
Decorative accents
Structural applications
Cleaning up and adding finishing touches
Cleaning your project
Applying metal patina
Project: Butterfly sun catcher
Project: Sunflower panel with metal frame
Project: Round rose window
Building leaded-glass projects
Selecting and working with lad came
Choosing the right size and profile of lead came
Stretching lead came
Cutting lead came
Preparing your work board and laying out your pattern
Constructing your lead project
Framing it up
Putting the project together piece by piece
Achieving the perfect lead fit
Squaring it up
Soldering lead-came projects
Setting your iron's temperature
Soldering joints and intersections
Removing excess solder
Finishing up and cleaning up
Making a panel airtight and waterproof
Polishing the glass and adding patina
Framing your project
Project: Geometric leaded panel
Project: Art nouveau tulip
Project: Round all-American panel
Making a stained-glass box
Selecting the glass for your box
Art glass
Mirrors
Beveled glass
Fun and interesting objects
Using special tools to construct a glass box
Visualizing the basic box layout
One size fits all: foolproof prep for cutting a perfect fit
Cutting the pieces using your strip cutter
Laying out and foiling the pieces
Assembling the basic box
Soldering the box pieces together
Attaching the hinges
Attaching the chain
Adding box feet
Mixing it up with some variations on the basic box
Project: Box with beveled top
Project: Box with a 3-D flower
Shedding some light with a basic panel lampshade
Different styles of lampshades: panel versus dome
Selecting the glass and hardware for your lampshade based on your pattern
Deciding what kind of glass to use and how much
Choosing the right lampshade hardware
Prepping your pattern and cutting out your glass pieces
Foiling the glass pieces
Laying out your pieces for lamp assembly
Soldering for stability
Tack soldering
Running smooth beads along your lamp's seams
Capping off, cleaning up, and adding patina
Putting your new skills to work: project patterns
Project tips and tricks
Enlarging a design
Selecting your glass
Cooper-foil projects
Hummingbird panel
Mr Buzz sun catcher
Floral panel
Lily panel
Lead-came projects
Wright-inspired panel
Picture-perfect panel
Landscape panel
Sunshine panel
Part 5: Adding A Little Heat To The Mix: Working With Warm Glass
Getting your studio ready for warm glass
Knowing what makes a good warm-glass studio
Space requirements
Electrical requirements
Ventilation
Adding the right tools and supplies to your warm-glass toolbox
Choosing the right kiln for your studio
Furnishing your kiln
Gathering a few other tools and supplies
Wearing the right safety gear
Selecting fusible glass
Determining glass compatibility
Choosing the right glass size to purchase
Spicing things up with glass shapes and characters
Preparing to fire and use your kiln
Making sure your studio is safe
Preparing shelves and molds
Test firing
Keeping firing charts
Starting simple with basic fusing techniques
Understanding the firing process for fusing glass
Initial heat-up segment
Ramp-up segment
Flash-cool segment
Anneal segment
Cool-down segment
Preparing the glass for fusing and firing up the kiln
Working with multiple layers of glass
Loading the kiln
Working with a table-top kiln
No peeking!
Project: Fused sun catcher
Heating things up with some advanced fusing techniques
Creating your own project design
Considering your project's size
Focusing on layers
Understanding the effects of stacking glass
Weaving glass
Adding wire and other inclusions to your projects
Wiring to hang
Using fiber paper to create holes in glass
Gluing hangers to fused projects
Project: Set of four glass coasters
Art of shaping warm glass
Gathering the tools you need to start shaping glass
Using the right type of kiln for slumping
Picking out and preparing glass molds
Opting for fancier glass
Thin fusing glass
Iridescent fusing glass
Dichroic glass
Glass frit
Preparing your glass for shaping
Cutting your fusing glass to fit your mold
Cleaning the glass
Decorating the glass
Fire it up! fusing and slumping your glass
First firing: fusing the glass
Second firing: slumping the glass
Project: Tropical bowl slumped into a mold
Project: Glass vase draped over a floral former
Parts Of Tens
Ten strategies to improve your soldering technique
Understanding how to control your soldering iron's temperature
Keep your soldering tip clean
Figure out how to hold your iron
Be loyal to your brands
Know that you can never use too much flux
Find the right flow and rhythm
Work on one area at a time
Keep your intersections clean and low
Mentally visualize the size of your lad joints
Practice, practice, practice
Ten glass works you must study
Bathers
Entombment
Feeding the flamingoes
Four seasons
Magnolia and irises
Minnehaha window
Mosaics
Peacock windows
Wisteria lamps and windows
Woman and cupid window
Index.

Edition Notes

Includes index.

Series
-- For dummies series, --For dummies

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
748.50282
Library of Congress
TT298 2010

The Physical Object

Pagination
xvi, 320 pages :
Number of pages
320

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL26465444M
Internet Archive
isbn_9780470591321
ISBN 10
0470591323
ISBN 13
9780470591321
LC Control Number
2010935561
OCLC/WorldCat
705196110
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July 17, 2019 Edited by Clean Up Bot import existing book
June 30, 2018 Created by ImportBot Initial record created, from Internet Archive item record.